Who are the Mennonites?

'Rooted in the Anabaptist tradition, cultivating, Christian discipleship as a way of life.'

bibleOur Roots

Mennonites are one of the longest-lived European Christian families, with roots back in the radical Reformation of the 16th century. Their lives are rooted in prayer, shared Bible study and household communities. They hold orthodox Christian belief in God, as Creator, Saviour and Sustainer.

Today Mennonites are renowned for their simplicity of lifestyle, peace-making, hospitality, service-to-others, community and rich spirituality in their daily discipleship as ‘followers of Jesus’.

Followers of Jesus

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Mennonites are Christians who love Jesus, follow his teaching, live in the forgiveness he made possible, and experience the power he gives through the Holy Spirit to transform their lives. In particular, Mennonites derive from a part of the Reformation known as Anabaptists or ‘the radical reformation’.

A Radical Discipleship

DDirk Willemsiscipleship, mutual support, following Jesus’ hard teaching on loving enemies and concern for justice and right living have been particularly important for Mennonites. Read about Dirk Willems, an Anabaptist who loved his enemy and paid with his life.

Mennonites take their name from a priest, Menno Simons, who spent much of the 16th century travelling the Netherlands, preaching, teaching and encouraging other Anabaptists, and by God’s grace escaped arrest from both Protestant and Roman Catholic authorities.

Mennonites Today

In 1996 the Mennonite Church affirmed a new Confession of Faith from a Mennonite Perspective which is available on the web.

In Britain and Ireland the Mennonites exist in close partnership with the Anabaptist Network. This is a network of individuals, congregations and organisations who identify strongly with Anabaptist values. More information about contemporary Anabaptists can be found on their site.

For information on the Mennonite Trust’s work today, click here. To read Alan Kreider’s essay on the history of the UK Mennonite presence, click here.

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